Friday, May 11, 2018

Thyme (Thymus Vulgaris)

Thyme (Thymus Vulgaris)

 So it turns out my source books differ in reference to Oberon's botanical musings. The first reference (Act iii, scene 2) is incorrect. The correct attribution is MND Act ii, Scene 1. I'll include the link to the No Fear Shakespeare Midsummer Night's Dream edition here.





The Plant-lore & Garden-craft of Shakespeare




Friday, September 16, 2016

Bard's Garden - A Shopping List

We're getting ready for some fall planting in our Shakespearean Garden,
 and pulled some screenshots from the book for easy reference.



 Ruling out the trees and what we've already planted, while focusing on the perennials (buy once, enjoy forever) here's a wish list for the garden going forward...

Aconitium
Buttercup

Hyssop


Lady-smock (Cuckoo flower

Larkspur

Long Purples

Savory



Wednesday, November 18, 2015

The Shakespearean Garden @ Astoria Library

In the coming weeks - I'll be posting pictures and quotes about the plants in our library's Shakespearean themed garden. A preliminary list of the plants we've identified (wild and cultivated) follows here:


balm
cabbage
carnation
carrot
cherry
columbine
daffodil
daisy
flower-de-luce (iris)
garlic
gillyvor (carnation)
grass herb of grace (rue)
holly
holy thistle honeysuckle
ivy
lavender
leek
lettuce
lily
love-in-idleness (pansy)
mace
mallows marybud (marigold)
mint
mistletoe
moss
onion
pansy
parsley
pea
plane tree
potato
radish
rhubarb
rose
rosemary
strawberry
thyme
turnip
violet
woodbine (honeysuckle)
wormwood

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Codex Borbonicus... A Sacred Almanac

So a Sacred Almanac of the Aztecs arrived the other day... This one in fact  

and it didn't even have to leave New York to do it.Thank you Hofstra for stepping up!

The book itself was limited to 600 copies and has some noticeable differences from the Tonomatl Aubin in style and content.

Compare the Aubin Quetzalcoatl sacrifice here in lithograph...


 

And here again in photograph...





To the Borbonicus scene - depicting the same principal actors...



Here we see the gods have switched places, with Quetzalcoatl on the right and Tepeyollotl on the left. The text goes on to say that symbol between them is the sign for war (the shield and darts) and that Tepeyolltol has a spider at his feet and is dressed in a jaguar skin (instead of being an actual jaguar). Q.'s left hand still holds the sign for excrement, and there is a basket between them which is supported by skulls and contains hearts...

Saturday, June 25, 2011

The Tonalamatl Aubin, Quetzcoatl, Tepeyollotli, and Drew University

My copy of the Tonalamatl Aubin came in a few weeks ago and I've been spending some time assimilating the images and doing some value-adding...

The library that graciously made it happen was the Drew University Library, in Madison New Jersey.

The book itself was originally published in German by Eduard Seler and is available in PDF format from the FAMSI website here.

Embarassingly, after having spent lots of time finegalling this giantly oversized book to get decent photocopies of the outline explanations - I found that they've all been scanned and look incredible - right here. Albeit in German...

Here's the original plate showing Quetzalcoatl holding a sacrificial victim in one hand and what, accoring to the translation, appears to be a turd or the symbol for "sin" in the other hand. The symbol is given as cuitlatl - excrement, sign of sin.




And finally, here's my version of the line drawings, using Photoshop's filtering effect "Glowing Edges" to give it a LightBrite look, and then Inversing the result to get a nice outline effect.



The book I received gave the explanations for all the regalia and parephenalia depicted in the insets, which I'll transcribe here...

Chief Person: Tepeyollotli - the voice of the mountain
Facing Him: teccizti – sea snail shell
Accompanying Person: Quetzalcouatl, - the Wind God
On His Breast: eca-ilacatz-coatl – the spirally twisted ornament of the Wind God
In His Hand: cuitlatl - excrement – sign of sin
Symbol: atl-tlachinolli – spear throwing (water) and conflagration, symbolic indication of war